It’s the first day to buy pot at a store in Ontario. Customers are lining up ‘to be part of history’

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It’s the first day to buy pot at a store in Ontario. Customers are lining up ‘to be part of history’


Prominent Toronto social justice lawyer Caryma Sa’d has found herself representing more than a few cannabis users over drug possession charges in her career. Now she intends to be the first person in the city to buy legal weed from a bricks-and-mortar retailer when the first store opens Monday.

“We get to be a part of history, it is a pretty cool thing to be part of the end of prohibition. And so here we are in front of the first legal storefront,” said Sa’d standing beside a lime green tent that she and her friend Marie Kamora, a fitness trainer had set up in front of the Hunny Pot Cannabis Co. on Queen St. W. “Kudos to the store for pulling it together. It wasn’t an easy feat with all the hurdles put in place. So we’re excited to support their business.”

Fitness trainer Marie Kamora and lawyer Caryma Sa’d were camped out all day (and night) outside of Hunny Pot Cannabis Co. on Queen St. West, hoping to be the first to legally buy weed at a retail store in Toronto on Monday morning. “It will be great to ... see what the first consumer experience is like,” Sa’d said.
Fitness trainer Marie Kamora and lawyer Caryma Sa’d were camped out all day (and night) outside of Hunny Pot Cannabis Co. on Queen St. West, hoping to be the first to legally buy weed at a retail store in Toronto on Monday morning. “It will be great to … see what the first consumer experience is like,” Sa’d said.  (Tony Wong / Toronto Star)

Toronto has five recreational pot shops slated for the downtown core, but the Hunny Pot is the only one ready to be open on time.

“Pot is shunned by a lot of countries and it has been stigmatized. But Canada is doing something different, it makes me proud that we’re being open minded by all this,” says Kamora.

“The prosecution of cannabis has been a historical injustice, but I’m happy that Canada is now at the forefront of change,” said Sa’d. “This is a great move, but there is a lot more work to be done in terms of fewer restrictions and regulations and reparations for people persecuted under drug laws that have lost livelihood as a result.”

“We didn’t figure on snow, but it will be worth it,” says Sa’d.

Pointing to her tent, Kamora, who passed the time by reading a self-help book, says “it’s actually pretty warm in there. We have blankets, we have pillows, we’re here for the cause.”

The two friends said they weren’t sure what their first purchase would ultimately be.

“I haven’t seen a menu yet. But I’m a pretty lazy person, so I’m thinking it’s going to be pre-rolled,” said Sa’d. “Although I guess it’s pretty funny that we’re here camping out when there are already (non-legal) dispensaries that have opened up in the city. But it will be great to be on the ground to see what the first consumer experience is like.”

Twitter: @tonydwong





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