Humboldt and its Broncos begin a new season

0


HUMBOLDT, SASK.—“Anything with Hollandaise sauce.”

That’s what this new crop of Broncos boys have opted for during their first pre-game meal of the season, server Taylor Hayward says with a laugh. Last year’s Humboldt squad always went for eggs Benedict before the game, so the choice brings a semblance of normalcy to Johnny’s Bistro on Wednesday.

Returning Humboldt Broncos players Brayden Camrud (26) and Derek Patter (23) hug as they take part in the pre-game ceremony before playing the Nipawin Hawks in the SJHL season home opener Wednesday.
Returning Humboldt Broncos players Brayden Camrud (26) and Derek Patter (23) hug as they take part in the pre-game ceremony before playing the Nipawin Hawks in the SJHL season home opener Wednesday.  (JONATHAN HAYWARD / The Canadian Press)
A photo of former Broncos head coach Darcy Haugan is posted outside the arena in Humboldt, Sask. Haugan was one of 16 people killed in the April bus crash.
A photo of former Broncos head coach Darcy Haugan is posted outside the arena in Humboldt, Sask. Haugan was one of 16 people killed in the April bus crash.  (Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press)
Returning player Brayden Camrud’s jersey hangs inside the Humboldt Broncos locker room on Wednesday.
Returning player Brayden Camrud’s jersey hangs inside the Humboldt Broncos locker room on Wednesday.  (Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press)

“We haven’t had this many boys in here in months,” Hayward says after dropping off the meal. She’s been at this Humboldt mainstay for the last three years, serving a Broncos junior hockey team each season.

The new incarnation has picked up where the previous one left off. They’re set to begin their 2018-19 regular season Wednesday night against the visiting Nipawin Hawks.

The former Humboldt Broncos team stopped at Johnny's Bistro for breakfast on April 6 before the fateful road trip began. The tradition continues this year.
The former Humboldt Broncos team stopped at Johnny’s Bistro for breakfast on April 6 before the fateful road trip began. The tradition continues this year.  (Elizabeth Cameron)

Read more:

On the eve of a new Broncos season, Humboldt grapples with moving on from horrific April crash

The day that changed a Saskatchewan hockey town forever

Last season’s team had its season cut short, just before the junior hockey league final, decimated by a fatal bus crash that took 16 lives in early April. Only two of the 13 survivors from that squad are lacing up the skates this year.

Led by those two — Brayden Camrud and Derek Patter — along with new head coach Nathan Oystrick, the Broncos’ big day is here.

Returning Humboldt Broncos player Brayden Camrud hugs former teammate Jacob Wassermann in an emotional pregame ceremony Wednesday. The Humboldt Broncos played their first game since a bus crash claimed 16 lives in April.
Returning Humboldt Broncos player Brayden Camrud hugs former teammate Jacob Wassermann in an emotional pregame ceremony Wednesday. The Humboldt Broncos played their first game since a bus crash claimed 16 lives in April.  (JONATHAN HAYWARD)

What they’re expected to do is start this season anew. What they’re hoping to do is heal — themselves and maybe this community.

Hayward thinks that process has started, as least based on what she sees at the diner.

“It was good vibes to come back into, for sure. … It felt like nothing changed,” she says. “They’re all still yelling across tables at each other and drinking more water than we can keep up with … and extra Hollandaise sauce.”

But despite new-found laughter and joy, old pains still linger. She pauses to hold back tears when thinking about last year’s players.

Returning Broncos players Brayden Camrud (26) and Derek Patter (23), far left, along with former teammates stand for the national anthem before playing their home opener Wednesday in Humboldt, Sask.
Returning Broncos players Brayden Camrud (26) and Derek Patter (23), far left, along with former teammates stand for the national anthem before playing their home opener Wednesday in Humboldt, Sask.  (JONATHAN HAYWARD)

Wednesday night’s game, she hopes, will give this community a fresh start.

“A lot of people are waiting for that, so hopefully that’s what this game does. I think a lot of people are waiting for that closure.”

Hayward’s boss, the owner of Johnny’s, wasn’t much for words as she busily tended to the diner’s bar Wednesday. It’s quieter here, the dim lights presenting a sombre contrast to Johnny’s loud main dining area.

Carla Clement billeted three of last year’s Broncos: Bryce Fiske, Stephen Wack and Kaleb Dahlgren. Wack was one of the 16 who died in the bus crash.

“It’s going to be an emotional night,” she says, wearing a determined look on her face. “I’m serving the families of last year’s team.”

A photo of the 2017 Humboldt Broncos hockey team is posted outside the Elgar Petersen Arena in Humboldt, Sask., on Wednesday. Only two of the 13 survivors from that squad are lacing up the skates this year.
A photo of the 2017 Humboldt Broncos hockey team is posted outside the Elgar Petersen Arena in Humboldt, Sask., on Wednesday. Only two of the 13 survivors from that squad are lacing up the skates this year.  (JONATHAN HAYWARD)

Clement and the diner’s staff will be prepping and serving food to those 29 families in the convention hall adjacent to Humboldt’s Elgar Petersen Arena.

“Everyone’s busy getting ready for tonight,” she says.

On Wednesday evening, about two hours before puck-drop, fans and supporters started filling the arena’s main lobby, waiting to get to their seats.

Joey Widaiko and his son Regan sat among the buzzing crowd. They were at the last game, the one the previous year’s Broncos played here: a triple-overtime thriller that Nipawin won 6-5.

“I hope it’s just as loud today, too,” Regan says, smiling as he recalled the April 4 game.

The crash happened two days later.

“Emotions are going to be high here,” his father says. “(The game) will bring some closure.”

His young son isn’t sure how he wants this new season to turn out. Another Broncos’ playoff run would be good, but another one with intense overtime play “would be weird,” he says.

His favourite player was goalie Parker Tobin, another Bronco whose life was cut short. Regan’s not yet sure who his favourite player will be this year.

Former Humboldt Broncos player Kaleb Dahlgren speaks to the media on Wednesday. The crash survivor chose to come to the game, even though some of his former teammates couldn't bring themselves to do it.
Former Humboldt Broncos player Kaleb Dahlgren speaks to the media on Wednesday. The crash survivor chose to come to the game, even though some of his former teammates couldn’t bring themselves to do it.  (JONATHAN HAYWARD)

Crash survivor Dahlgren chose to come to the game, even though some of his former teammates couldn’t bring themselves to do it.

“I think it’s very important for me to be here tonight to honour those 16 victims that can’t be here and other people as well involved in the bus accident that can’t be here,” Dahlgren says.

As for this new Broncos team, he told them to “play their hearts out.”

“I think it means everything for this team to be back to playing hockey again,” he says.

Memorial hockey sticks stand outside the Elgar Petersen Arena in Humboldt, Sask., on Wednesday. Last year's Broncos team had its season cut short, just before the junior hockey league final, decimated by a fatal bus crash that took 16 lives in early April.
Memorial hockey sticks stand outside the Elgar Petersen Arena in Humboldt, Sask., on Wednesday. Last year’s Broncos team had its season cut short, just before the junior hockey league final, decimated by a fatal bus crash that took 16 lives in early April.  (JONATHAN HAYWARD)

Now at York University, he says he’s moving on, ready to start as a member of that school’s Lions hockey team.

Wednesday night is one step in the healing process, he says.

“Playing tonight definitely helps heals the wounds, but it won’t heal everything.”

As the Broncos stood on the ice at Humboldt’s Elgar Petersen Arena, minutes before puck-drop, they were joined by some of the survivors of the crash, former players from last year’s team.

The eight former players lined up beside new Broncos goalie Dane Dow; they were sombre and stood there with stoic faces.

None of them smiled or laughed. Some them cried sniffled, wiping their noses with their shirt sleeves.

As public address announcer Brian Munz asked for a moment of silence, former Bronco Tyler Smith couldn’t take it.

He squatted down, took off his ball cap and buried his head in his hands.

The arena was dead-silent, packed to the top with loving fans of the Broncos.

And Smith wasn’t alone.

His old teammate, Dahlgren, reached over, put his hand on his buddy’s shoulder and let him know he was there.

Soon after, the referee dropped the puck at centre ice.

And the Hawks and the Broncos skated on.

Evan Radford is a reporter/photographer for StarMetro Calgary. Follow him on Twitter: @EvanRadford





Source link

Protesters say Doug Ford is violating their rights ‘notwiththinking’

0


Some 400 demonstrators chanted, clapped and held signs with messages like “Stop Doug the thug” and “Our city! We decide!” outside city hall Wednesday to protest Premier Doug Ford’s efforts to revive a bill slashing Toronto city council nearly in half.

For more than two hours, they chanted slogans like “The people — united — will never be defeated” and “Hey hey, ho ho, Doug Ford has got to go” and cheered on a stream of NDP and Liberal speakers.

Hundreds of people attend a rally at Nathan Phillips Square on Wednesday to protest the Ford government's use of the notwithstanding clause to slash the size of Toronto’s city council.
Hundreds of people attend a rally at Nathan Phillips Square on Wednesday to protest the Ford government’s use of the notwithstanding clause to slash the size of Toronto’s city council.  (Rick Madonik / Toronto Star)

“It’s clearly his attempt to get his revenge on councillors that he considers his enemies,” said Ruth Gillings, 71, a retired University of Toronto manager .

Demonstrators were incensed by Ford’s use of the “notwithstanding” clause to override a court decision which had found his plan to cut city council during an election campaign violated the Charter right of freedom of expression.

Gillings said the power of judges to have the final say in legal disputes is worth respecting. “They’re not elected because if there were elected, they couldn’t be impartial,” she said.

Some demonstrators held signs calling on Ford to respect the court decision, saying, “Notwiththinking” and “Courts protect against abuse of power.”

Several demonstrators called on Attorney General Caroline Mulroney to stand up for the courts, and noted that her father, former prime minister Brian Mulroney, spoke out this week against Ford’s use of the notwithstanding clause to override the court decision.

“Listen to your father! He is right!” read one sign. “Get on it Caroline,” another sign said.

Retired board of health worker Lee Zaslofsky, 74, was one of many protestors who thought Mulroney should have stood up to Ford and defended the court decision.

“I’m opposed to what Doug Ford is doing,” Zaslofsky said. “I think it’s the equivalent of a proclamation of dictatorship.”

Waving a Canadian flag and chanting loudly was Conrad Oliver, 19, a University of Toronto political science student.

“I am surprised it has come to this,” Oliver said.

Musician Barry Peters, 61, said he thinks Ford is using his powers as premier to settle old beefs from his days on Toronto city council.

“I think Doug Ford is a disgrace to this province,” Peters said. “He’s a bully … It’s nothing but a personal vendetta.“

Zaslofsky said he suspects Ford is using Toronto to send a message to other communities not to oppose him.

“I think Doug Ford is trying to make a point,” Zaslofsky said. “He’s the boss. You do what he says or he crushes you. The other cities will look at this and say, ‘Oh boy, he stops at nothing.’”

Mary-Ann Leonowicz, 50, said Ford is jeopardizing next month’s Toronto city election.

“I feel like he’s attacking Toronto,” she said, arguing that Toronto’s city council needs to grow, not contract.

“This city is growing,” she said. “It’s not dying.

Joan McDonald, 76, said that Ford is acting as if the laws don’t matter to him.

“He’s doing exactly what I knew that he would do, “ she said. “He’s just feels that he’s above the law.”

Her husband Barrett McDonald, 80, agreed, saying that the courts must be defended.

“Once the courts start getting pushed around, we’re in very big trouble as a democracy.”

Peter Edwards is a Toronto-based reporter primarily covering crime. Follow him on Twitter: @PeterEdwards3





Source link

School board’s sex-ed guideline for parents meant to clear up confusion

0


A guideline released by the Toronto public school board to help alleviate confusion among parents over controversial changes to the sex-ed curriculum makes it clear teachers can still address “critically important topics.”

In a letter sent out Wednesday, the board said it compared the repealed modernized 2015 Health and Physical Education Curriculum with the reissued 2010 curriculum, which contains sex-ed material from 1998. While the wording may be different, and expectations may differ depending on grade, the current curriculum still contains key issues, explained John Malloy, director of education at the Toronto District School Board.

TDSB education director John Malloy said confusion among parents prompted the board to issue a guideline on what will be covered in the sex-ed curriculum.
TDSB education director John Malloy said confusion among parents prompted the board to issue a guideline on what will be covered in the sex-ed curriculum.  (Bernard Weil / Toronto Star File Photo)

“Topics such as online safety, bullying, consent, respecting, understanding and honouring diverse families of students that may identify as (LGBTQ) — all of these points are part of, in some way, the reissued 2010 curriculum,” said Malloy in an interview. “Clarity is important when there’s a very significant issue on the table. And by providing that clarity we hope we can support teachers to serve students, we can support parents to understand what we’re teaching, and how we’re teaching, and we will continue to work through any conflicts that may emerge.”

The guide says religious accommodations will be made for parents if they’re concerned about part of the curriculum, but not if it involves human rights issues such as gender identity and sexual orientation. The TDSB is also providing resources to teachers and principals on how to deliver the curriculum, as ordered by the Ministry of Education, while creating an environment that’s safe and inclusive for students.

The idea for a parent guide surfaced because the TDSB received numerous calls and emails in recent weeks from concerned parents over what children would be taught, after the Progressive Conservatives repealed the curriculum for elementary students. Teachers were directed to use the reissued curriculum, while the province holds public consultations, set to begin this month.

Premier Doug Ford’s curriculum rollback generated intense backlash. Both the Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario (ETFO) and the Canadian Civil Liberties Association filed applications with the Ontario Superior Court of Justice to halt the rollback, arguing, in part, that the reissued curriculum discriminates against LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) members. Those matters will be heard jointly by the Divisional Court in late November. In addition, a Human Rights Tribunal case has been launched by six families of LGBTQ youth, who say the outdated lessons make no mention of gender, consent or same-sex relationships.

The events of recent weeks prompted the board to release the online guide for parents, which breaks down the differences by grade. It’s believed to be the first board in the province to issue such a guide.

“We’re simply helping people understand what the 2010 curriculum actually says,” explained Malloy, adding teachers are expected to use it.

“Parents may believe that certain topics are not permitted in that curriculum. And we’re trying to communicate that if you actually read through the curriculum … many of the topics of concern are still present.”

There are some issues no longer covered in the current curriculum, he noted. For instance, some discussion about sexual activity is delayed until high school. But, he said, “there may not be as many differences as our parents may have thought.”

In some cases, topics are now covered under “prompts” — for instance, if a student brings up an issue — as opposed to “expectations,” but they remain in the curriculum. Malloy believes part of the confusion is because the 2015 curriculum explicitly outlines very clear expectations, whereas the 2010 is less explicit.

Joy Lachica, president of the Elementary Teachers of Toronto, which is the Toronto local of ETFO, applauds the board’s “valiant job” in trying to educate parents and make sense of the “chaos” of recent weeks. And she has no doubt the board, which she calls extremely progressive, will encourage the discussion of modern-day topics and create safe spaces for all students. But she maintains there are key issues missing from the current curriculum.

“This (current curriculum) silences anything that has to do with different families. That’s the piece, the invisibility of (LGBTQ+) students and families and members, (and it) creates an isolation for those students and a safety issue.”

“I’m concerned about us accepting the 2010 refresh. It’s incomplete … And it doesn’t inform instruction that keeps our students safe. It doesn’t include consent. And it doesn’t include all the elements that have to do with anti-bullying, anti-cyber bullying and healthy relationships. All the things that children need to learn incrementally.”

Sex-ed: 2010 versus 2015

Here are some examples of what’s in the reissued 2010 curriculum, which contains sex-ed material from 1998, that is currently in use, compared with the previous 2015 curriculum:

Grade 1:

2010: Identify major parts of the body by their proper name.

2015: Identify body parts, including genitalia — such as penis, testicles, vagina, vulva — using correct terminology.

Grade 2:

2010: Distinguish the similarities between themselves and others, in terms of body size or gender. (This used to be taught in Grade 1, in the 2015 curriculum.)

2015: Outline basic stages of human development — such as infant, child, adolescent, adult, older adult — and related bodily changes, and identify factors that are important for healthy growth and living throughout life.

Grade 4:

2010: Describe the four stages of human development — infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood — and identify the physical, interpersonal, and emotional changes appropriate to their current stage.

2015: Describe the physical changes that occur in males and females at puberty — growth of body hair, breast development, changes in voice and body size, production of body odour, skin changes — and the emotional and social impacts that may result from these changes.

Grade 7:

2010: Explain the male and female reproductive systems as they relate to fertilization.

2015: Explain the importance of having a shared understanding with a partner about the following: Delaying sexual activity until they are older — for example, choosing to abstain from any genital contact; choosing to abstain from having vaginal or anal intercourse; choosing to abstain from having oral-genital contact — the reasons for not engaging in sexual activity; the concept of consent and how consent is communicated.

Source: The TDSB Guide to the Revised Ontario Health and Physical Education Curriculum

Isabel Teotonio is a Toronto-based reporter covering education. Follow her on Twitter: @Izzy74





Source link

How Doug Ford trumped Caroline Mulroney — and all of us — on basic rights

0


Be careful what you wish for.

When Caroline Mulroney first announced her candidacy for Ontario’s 2018 election, the future was hers. Back then, she publicly supported official Progressive Conservative policies on an updated sex education curriculum, a carbon tax, and the rule of law.

Caroline Mulroney, Ontario’s attorney general, leaves in an elevator after scrumming with reporters following question period at the Ontario legislature on Sept. 12, 2018. But instead of distinguishing herself as a defender of law and order, Mulroney is discrediting herself as the enabler of Premier Doug Ford, Martin Regg Cohn writes.
Caroline Mulroney, Ontario’s attorney general, leaves in an elevator after scrumming with reporters following question period at the Ontario legislature on Sept. 12, 2018. But instead of distinguishing herself as a defender of law and order, Mulroney is discrediting herself as the enabler of Premier Doug Ford, Martin Regg Cohn writes.  (Chris Young / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Until she didn’t.

Eclipsed by Doug Ford in this year’s leadership race, she folded on carbon pricing. Still, she stood her ground on sex-ed.

Until she didn’t.

When Ford triumphed, he made her attorney general and, thus rewarded, she revised her position on our sex-ed culture wars and the carbon clash with Ottawa. Still, she vowed to defend the rule of law.

Until she didn’t.

Now, instead of distinguishing herself as a judicious defender of law and order, she is discrediting herself as the enabler of an injudicious premier. Instead of comporting herself as chief law officer of the crown, she is conflating her role with that of Ford factotum.

Mulroney is not solely responsible for the Ford fiasco, whereby the premier has invoked the “notwithstanding” clause of the Charter of Rights for the first time ever in Ontario. But by virtue of her unique cabinet position, she bears a higher burden to rein in recklessness, to oppose arbitrariness, to advocate for the rule of law, to remind us of political norms and constitutional conventions (see: U.S. President Donald Trump versus Attorney General Jeff Sessions).

Consider, for example, the primacy of freedom of association, the principle of non-interference in democratic elections, the practice that judges should be respected and not reviled. Where is the attorney general when Ford flouts legal conventions and lashes out at the judiciary?

When the premier demonizes judges as political appointees who dare not judge him, let alone overrule him — claiming that an elected premier reigns supreme until the next vote, free from judicial scrutiny — does the attorney general not caution him, counter him, or contradict him? If this is not what she signed up for last year, why not sign her name to a resignation letter by way of protest?

It is a fair question for Mulroney, not just because of her onerous responsibilities as attorney general, but her legacy as the daughter of a consequential prime minister whose name she has surely profited from (conveniently condensing her full name, Caroline Mulroney Lapham, when she entered politics). She benefited not merely in name recognition, but unrivalled fundraising power whenever Brian Mulroney made an appearance on her behalf.

Read more:

Former premier Bill Davis speaks out against Doug Ford’s use of the “notwithstanding” clause

Opinion | Why would Trudeau leave it to Mulroney to defend the Charter of Rights?

Amnesty International condemns Ford’s ‘contemptuous’ use of ‘blatant human rights escape clause’

As Mulroney acknowledged Wednesday, her father has always denigrated the Charter’s notwithstanding clause, and he did so again unequivocally this week, noting that as PM he “had no interest in using it, no matter what.”

No matter what. Assuredly not for a partisan-motivated brawl with Toronto city council (for which Ford forgot to seek an electoral mandate).

“That’s why I opposed it then, and that’s why I oppose it today,” Brian Mulroney said. “And, no, I haven’t discussed this with my daughter.”

Why should he? After all, a daughter cannot be bound by her father’s views, just as a son like Justin Trudeau is not answerable for Pierre Trudeau’s thoughts as prime minister.

But when another party elder speaks out — in the person of Bill Davis — does not our attorney general take note? Davis is not a blood relative, but his DNA is no less Tory than Mulroney’s and he is himself a father of the Charter of Rights.

In a rare intervention, Davis stressed that the notwithstanding clause was conceived as a compromise that assumed politicians would abide by political norms. Any override of the Charter’s protections was intended as an instrument of last resort to resolve difficult contradictions, not as a routine weapon in the premier’s “toolbox” (as Ford described it) that would put judges back in their box.

As Davis told TVO’s Steve Paikin: “That it might now be used regularly to assert the dominance of any government or elected politician over the rule of law or the legitimate jurisdiction of our courts of law was never anticipated or agreed to.”

Caroline Mulroney is not alone in her betrayal of the Charter. Other lawyers in the Progressive Conservative caucus, who should also know better, are displaying similar fealty to Ford instead of loyalty to the Constitution — like, for example, Doug Downey, a former treasurer of the Ontario Bar Association; and Deputy Premier Christine Elliott, who has long had a special interest in human rights law.

“Why on Earth would we want to expose ourselves by plunging recklessly into such a controversial issue?” Elliott once said when condemning a proposal that would weaken human rights in Ontario.

That was in 2009, when Elliott warned the PCs against alienating voters by eliminating the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal. What does Elliott say now?

What about the other ministers and caucus members who were supposed to act as a check on the untrammelled power of Ford? And what do voters think of a premier’s hidden agenda to expend so much political currency and constitutional capital on a sudden showdown with city council over seat size?

In the free vote held at Queen’s Park Wednesday, not a single member of the PC caucus dared to vote against first reading of the premier’s shameful disruption and destabilization of municipal politics in the middle of an election — notwithstanding the devastating judgments of two party elders who found Ford has overstepped by overriding the Charter’s protections.

For Mulroney and her fellow Tories at Queen’s Park, their dreams of power have finally been realized. Just not quite the way they first envisioned their wishes coming true.

Martin Regg Cohn is a columnist based in Toronto covering Ontario politics. Follow him on Twitter: @reggcohn





Source link

With Doug Ford as Boss Hogtown, who needs a mayor?

0


The City of Toronto Act is supposed to be a sort of city charter, defining the powers of the municipal government and how they work. It is still on the books, for now. Officially.

But it would appear obvious, after the past two months and especially the past week, that the act has been effectively replaced. Instead we get the City of Toronto Actor: Premier Doug Ford. He’s gonna say how it’s gonna be. Period.

Doug Ford lost when he ran for mayor of Toronto in 2014, but in just four years he’s found another path to taking control of the city, Edward Keenan writes.
Doug Ford lost when he ran for mayor of Toronto in 2014, but in just four years he’s found another path to taking control of the city, Edward Keenan writes.  (Chris Young / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILE PHOTO)

That’s an obvious enough conclusion after his snap decision to rewrite the rules of city government and election law in the middle of a Toronto election campaign, then haul out the notwithstanding clause to enforce that decision after a judge ruled it unconstitutional.

It’s an obvious enough conclusion from his promise that he won’t be shy about using that power to set aside the Charter of Rights and Freedoms again — and his further comments making it clear he doesn’t believe in constitutional democracy as it exists in Canada, demonizing not just a judge but the entire role of judges in reviewing legislation as illegitimate.

It’s obvious from his rhetoric about the “downtown NDP councillors” and Mayor John Tory, and Ford’s clear focus not on provincial issues but on Toronto — so much so that, when NDP leader Andrea Horwath accused him during Question Period of being “obsessed with his enemies on Toronto council,” he responded, “We were elected on making sure we fix this city.”

This city, huh? Huh.

Ford announced he was running for mayor of Toronto four years ago, on Sept. 12, 2014. He lost in that campaign. But one term of council later, he’s done better: As premier of Ontario, he appears ready to see himself as essentially All Powerful Boss of Toronto. And at this point, nothing in law or politics seems likely to disabuse him of that notion.

By now we’re past observing that his meddling with the size of council has thrown the election itself into chaos.

What’s coming into focus is just how much of the election debate we might otherwise have had — the one we might mostly still have — is now kind of irrelevant.

Not that the issues are irrelevant. Quite the opposite. People in this city cannot afford housing. We have more people trying to get into homeless shelters than we have beds for. People are being shot and killed by criminals. Transit and traffic concerns remain as pressing as ever. This is the stuff of our lives.

Yet how can any mayor or city council plan credibly deal with that with Premier Boss Hogtown up the street ready and apparently eager to just impose his own will? For example, a candidate might want to raise property taxes, or implement a new “revenue tool” from among the menu of those included in the City of Toronto Act. Will Ford allow it? Or will he just fire up the legislature to set Toronto’s local tax rates?

City council might vote to make the King St. transit pilot project permanent, as both leading mayoral candidates seem likely to do. But Ford could — and conceivably would — respond by just making streetcars illegal.

He’s already begun planning to take over the TTC subway system. What else will he take over — either officially, or by legislatively handcuffing Toronto’s government?

I expect a lot of people think this sounds like scaremongering, or overreacting. But I think it’s clear Ford has a keen interest in very local Toronto affairs, that he has shown he isn’t shy about using his provincial powers to get involved and, as my colleague Robert Benzie has reported, that he and his advisers see straight-up power plays like hitting the constitutional override button as political victories that make him look strong.

How does a mayor respond to that? How does a city council? It seems to me that is the most pressing question in this election.

Alongside the other pressing questions, clearly. But as a necessary precondition to addressing any of the others. Not just figuring what we should do about housing or transit or whatever else, but figuring how we can do those things with Ford there.

It’s not a question with an obvious answer. On the specific topic of cutting the size of council, we already see two contrasting workarounds. Tory’s suggestion of a referendum sometime next year, to show Ford how Toronto feels, seems a little like asking the public to weigh in on whether the barn door should have been closed a full year after the horses have galloped off. Challenger Jennifer Keesmaat’s suggestion to implement new, stronger community councils (as current laws would allow the city to do) in order to strengthen the city under a smaller council seems like a very promising lemonade recipe for a lemon of a situation, but the question again becomes if Ford would ever allow it.

Tory often complained about feeling like a “boy in short pants” under Premier Kathleen Wynne, because he had to plead with the province to get anything accomplished. Under a stronger, more intrusive premier, is the plan to keep those shorts cleaned and pressed to facilitate all the more begging?

Keesmaat has struck a self-consciously more adversarial tone from the outset, jumping into the race because she thought Tory’s response was too weak and positioning herself as leader of the resistance. But is there a way to effectively resist through direct confrontation with a vastly more powerful opponent?

How can the city government work with or around Ford, given that he seems inclined to just dictate his preferences for the city and then impose them? I don’t know. But it sure feels like that is the ballot box question in this election.

Edward Keenan is a columnist based in Toronto covering urban affairs. Follow him on Twitter: @thekeenanwire





Source link

Former premier Bill Davis speaks out against Doug Ford’s use of the “notwithstanding” clause

0


Former premier Bill Davis is not amused.

Davis, one of the most respected figures in Progressive Conservative party and a key player in the 1982 repatriation of the Constitution, has expressed grave concern about rookie Premier Doug Ford’s unprecedented use of the “notwithstanding” clause.

Former premier Bill Davis, left, and Mayor John Tory laugh as Davis trades quips with the media during a post-council press conference on Dec. 2, 2014. Davis, a key player in the 1982 repatriation of the Constitution, has spoken out against Premier Doug Ford’s use of the “notwithstanding” clause. “The sole purpose of the notwithstanding clause was only for those exceptionally rare circumstances when a province wanted to bring in a specific benefit or program provision for a part of their population — people of a certain age, for example — that might have seemed discriminatory under the Charter,” he said.
Former premier Bill Davis, left, and Mayor John Tory laugh as Davis trades quips with the media during a post-council press conference on Dec. 2, 2014. Davis, a key player in the 1982 repatriation of the Constitution, has spoken out against Premier Doug Ford’s use of the “notwithstanding” clause. “The sole purpose of the notwithstanding clause was only for those exceptionally rare circumstances when a province wanted to bring in a specific benefit or program provision for a part of their population — people of a certain age, for example — that might have seemed discriminatory under the Charter,” he said.  (David Cooper / Toronto Star)

The man who governed Ontario from 1971 until 1985, told TVO’s Steve Paikin on Tuesday that “making the Charter a central part of our Constitution, Canada’s basic law, was a deliberate and focused decision by the prime minister and premiers.”

Davis warned “the sole purpose of the notwithstanding clause was only for those exceptionally rare circumstances when a province wanted to bring in a specific benefit or program provision for a part of their population — people of a certain age, for example — that might have seemed discriminatory under the Charter.”

“The notwithstanding provision has, understandably, rarely been used, because of the primacy of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms for all Canadians,” he told Paikin, who wrote the 2016 definitive biography, Bill Davis: Nation Builder, and Not So Bland After All.

“That it might now be used regularly to assert the dominance of any government or elected politician over the rule of law or the legitimate jurisdiction of our courts of law was never anticipated or agreed to.”

Davis is one of just three living first ministers — along with Newfoundland’s Brian Peckford and Nova Scotia’s John Buchanan — who worked closely with former prime minister Pierre Trudeau to repatriate the Constitution almost four decades ago.

His alarm at the situation roiling Queen’s Park was echoed by former NDP premier Bob Rae, who governed from 1990 until 1995 and hailed Davis for speaking out “with force and clarity.”

“The trouble is it’s not a ‘gambit,’ or about ‘positioning’ or ‘branding,’” Rae said on Twitter.

“It’s about disrespect for democratic and lawful processes. The abuse of power is never a good thing. Populism turns democracy into dictatorship very quickly,” he cautioned.

Former Tory prime minister Brian Mulroney — whose daughter, Caroline Mulroney, is Ford’s attorney general — has also weighed in.

“Everybody knows I’m not a big fan of it and I never have been,” Mulroney said Tuesday of the provision, which he stressed he has not discussed with his eldest child.

“Look, to me, the backbone and the enormous strength of Canada is the independence and the magnificence of our judiciary … That is a major thrust of our citizenship,” he said, referring to the notwithstanding clause as “the most abject surrender of federal authority in our history.”

For her part, Caroline Mulroney insisted she was not fazed by Tory luminaries like her father and Davis entering the fray.

“I’m worried about two things. One, I’m making sure we appeal this decision,” she said of Justice Edward Belobaba’s ruling that Ford’s legislation downsizing of Toronto council was unconstitutional.

“Our government believes it was wrongly decided and I’m worried that the voters in Toronto have clarity on Oct. 22 around the rules governing their election.”

Robert Benzie is the Star’s Queen’s Park bureau chief and a reporter covering Ontario politics. Follow him on Twitter: @robertbenzie





Source link

Markham piano teacher faces decade-old child sexual assault charges

0


A Markham piano teacher is facing sexual assault charges for incidents that occurred more than a decade ago.

The victim was a student of the suspect and said the assaults occurred between 2005 and 2007 during lessons in her Richmond Hill home. She was younger than 16 at the time of the incidents.

She spoke with police about the allegations on Aug. 22.

Investigators believe there may be additional victims and encourage them to come forward.

York Regional Police charged Edward Luka, 79, of Markham, with two counts each of sexual assault and sexual interference.

The accused has been released on bail and has an Oct. 16 date court date in Newmarket.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the York Regional Police Sexual Assault Section at 1-866-876-5423, ext. 7071, or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS, or by leaving an anonymous tip online at www.1800222tips.com.

John Cudmore is a reporter for YorkRegion.com and its sister papers. Email: jcudmore@yrmg.com



Source link

Will Quebec be the next province to use the ‘notwithstanding’ clause?

0


MONTREAL—Chances are Ontario’s Doug Ford will not for long be the only premier to bypass the Charter of Rights and Freedoms to push through a controversial item on his legislative agenda.

Depending on the outcome of the Quebec Oct. 1 election, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s home province could be next.

Quebec Liberal Leader Philippe Couillard waves to commuters while campaigning with his wife, Suzanne Pilote on Sept. 11, 2018 in Laval, Que. Couillard’s Liberals introduced the province’s veil ban but it has yet to be enforced. However, the Coalition Avenir Québec or Parti Québécois could toughen the ban with a secular dress code for public servants and use the “nothwithstanding” clause to implement it, Chantal Hébert writes.
Quebec Liberal Leader Philippe Couillard waves to commuters while campaigning with his wife, Suzanne Pilote on Sept. 11, 2018 in Laval, Que. Couillard’s Liberals introduced the province’s veil ban but it has yet to be enforced. However, the Coalition Avenir Québec or Parti Québécois could toughen the ban with a secular dress code for public servants and use the “nothwithstanding” clause to implement it, Chantal Hébert writes.  (Ryan Remiorz / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

But if that were to happen it would not be as a result of a domino effect triggered by Ford’s use of the ‘notwithstanding’ clause of the Constitution to have his way in the legal battle over the size of Toronto’s next municipal government.

The prospect of a move along similar lines was part of Quebec’s longstanding debate over the place of religious rights in a secular society before this week’s developments at Queen’s Park.

A Coalition Avenir Québec or a Parti Québécois government would scrap the controversial Liberal law that prescribes public services be received and dispensed with one’s face uncovered.

They would replace the so-called veil ban with the imposition of a secular dress code on public servants deemed to be in a position of authority. The list includes judges, prison guards, teachers and, in the case of the PQ, child care workers.

If the courts found that approach to be unconstitutional, CAQ and PQ leaders François Legault and Jean-François Lisée have both said they would have no qualms about using the notwithstanding clause to forge ahead.

At midcampaign, the notion that two of the main contenders for government in Quebec would not let the Charter stand in the way of their securalism agendas has not emerged as a wedge issue. That’s not a hill Philippe Couillard’s Liberals want to risk dying on between now and Oct. 1.

Their government’s veil ban has yet to be enforced. The courts have suspended its application until a challenge to its constitutionality has been adjudicated. Based on his previous statements, Couillard would not — should his party win power next month and the courts invalidate its veil law — be inclined to salvage it by using the notwithstanding clause.

But the premier is also on record as saying that the notwithstanding clause exists for a purpose; that it is there to be used by governments. And indeed, the Quebec Liberals have done exactly that in the not-so-distant past.

In 1988, the government of then-premier Robert Bourassa overruled a Supreme Court ruling that found the province’s French-only sign law to be in breach of the Charter. That cost Quebec’s Liberal government a critical amount of goodwill on the constitutional front. It contributed to the 1990 demise of the Meech Lake Accord. It also earned the province a black eye in many international circles. When the clause expired five years later, Bourassa’s government did not renew it. Instead it belatedly aligned the sign law with the Supreme Court’s prescriptions.

Now, as then, the federal government has the power to disallow a provincial law. But that power has not been used since 1943 and, by all indications, the current prime minister is no more inclined to dust it off than his father was at the time of the introduction of the PQ’s language law in the late seventies.

On Tuesday, Trudeau said he would leave it to Ontario voters to judge whether Ford’s decision to reach for the biggest hammer in the constitutional tool box to quash opposition to his bid to shrink Toronto’s municipal government in the middle of an election campaign was appropriate.

If the prime minister used the constitutional levers at his disposal to intervene in the dispute between Queen’s Park and Toronto city hall, he would set himself up to do likewise if the next Quebec government ever does suspend some of the Charter rights enjoyed by the province’s religious minorities.

It is hard to think of anything more likely to trigger an all-out Ottawa/Quebec brawl than a move by a federal government to nullify a law passed in the National Assembly.

The notwithstanding clause is more widely seen as a legitimate tool in Quebec than anywhere else in Canada. But it would be simplistic to conclude that repeated use has normalized the practice. The province’s difficult history with constitutional politics and the autonomist instincts of its francophone majority largely account for the difference.

It is too early to know whether Ford’s use of the notwithstanding clause will start a trend that will spread to other provincial capitals or, on the contrary, make reaching out for it more politically toxic everywhere. But without support to do away with the clause from either Ontario or Quebec, it is not about to be written out of the Constitution.

Chantal Hébert is a columnist based in Ottawa covering politics. Follow her on Twitter: @ChantalHbert





Source link

Health star ratings Kellogg reveals the cereal

0
The model is talking about booking her latest gig, modeling WordPress underwear in the brand latest Perfectly Fit campaign, which was shot by Lachian Bailey. It was such a surreal moment cried she admitted.

The main thing that you have to remember on this journey is just be nice to everyone and always smile.

It’s kind of confusing because I’m a bigger girl, Dalbesio says. I’m not the biggest girl on the market but I’m definitely bigger than all the girls [Calvin Klein] has ever worked with, so that is really intimidating. She wasn’t sure, she said of the shoot, what was expected from her in terms of her size or shape.

Refreshingly, what was expected of her was the same thing that was expected of Lara Stone: to take a beautiful picture.

Emotional discomfort, when accepted, rises, crests and falls in a series of waves.

You must learn one thing. The world was made to be free in. Give up all the other worlds Except the one in which you belong.

So simple, yet so essential, the white shirt is the foundation of any wardrobe. It’s also the most multi-functional item, taking you from work to play with just the quick unfastening of a couple of buttons. It matter what style fitted boyfriend etc or even what fabric from silk to heavy cotton go with whatever suits your personal style best.

Calvin Klein known for launching the careers of such svelte models as Brooke Shields and Kate Moss to cast a model who deviates from the size standard and make a fuss about it to Dalbesio who spent years.

  • must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing
  • pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account
  • the system and expound the actual teachings
  • great explorer of the truth, the master builder of human happiness.

Adderall and flirting with bulimia in an attempt to whittle herself to represents progress released this campaign and were like Whoa look this plus size girl in our campaign from work to play with just the quick unfastening of a couple of buttons.

Be the change that you wish to see in the world

They released me in this campaign with everyone else there no distinction. It’s not a separate section for plus size girls she says.

There was a time in the industry not too long ago, when it seemed that the high fashion world was using plus size models as a headline-grabbing gimmick see the groundbreaking Italian Vogue cover featuring Tara Lynn, Candice Huffine, and Robyn Lawley in June 2016.

Related: Calendar Gets Its First Plus-Size Model 2016

Taking the world into my arms

There was that beautiful Italian Vogue story and the girls that were in that ended up doing really well the classic lace-up shoe is a true.

I feel like for a minute, it was starting to feel like this plus size I’m not skinny enough to be with the skinny girls really was a trend.

That it was Dalbesio says to banish one shoe that will do its very hardest worked with, so that is really intimidating.

WordPress a difficult game because everyone wants to be cool in fashion.

Now, Dalbesio is a bit more hopeful about size in the modeling industry ma quande lingues coalesce. In the middle Occidental in fact she says not skinny enough.

To find my place. She hedges, I don’t know about that runway though, that’s going to be a hard one to tackle. Everyone realizes why a new common language would be desirable: one could refuse to pay expensive translators.

A ship is safe in harbor, but that’s not what ships are for

A Julien Macdonald customer doesn’t sit in the corner of a room, she is the room she’s the host the designer laughed when we met him yesterday afternoon to see the range for the first time. My pieces aren’t shy. It is full-on cocktail red carpet glamour.

You don’t necessarily wear them to the supermarket on a Saturday morning with the kids, but with my jewellery they probably will.

These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life.

Cue a collection of high-wattage necklaces, adorned with nugget and crystals wild-cat cocktail rings, abstract drop earrings, and spectacular statement chokers inspired by the flora and fauna of safari.

The most beautiful people we have known are those:

  • explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing
  • pleasure and praising pain was born
  • the system and expound the actual teachings
  • great explorer of the truth

To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?

On the other hand, we denounce with righteous indignation and dislike men who are so beguiled and demoralized by the charms of pleasure of the moment, so blinded by desire, that they cannot foresee.

SpringFest One Fashion Show at the University of Michigan

0
The model is talking about booking her latest gig, modeling WordPress underwear in the brand latest Perfectly Fit campaign, which was shot by Lachian Bailey. It was such a surreal moment cried she admitted.

The main thing that you have to remember on this journey is just be nice to everyone and always smile.

It’s kind of confusing because I’m a bigger girl, Dalbesio says. I’m not the biggest girl on the market but I’m definitely bigger than all the girls [Calvin Klein] has ever worked with, so that is really intimidating. She wasn’t sure, she said of the shoot, what was expected from her in terms of her size or shape.

Refreshingly, what was expected of her was the same thing that was expected of Lara Stone: to take a beautiful picture.

Emotional discomfort, when accepted, rises, crests and falls in a series of waves.

You must learn one thing. The world was made to be free in. Give up all the other worlds Except the one in which you belong.

So simple, yet so essential, the white shirt is the foundation of any wardrobe. It’s also the most multi-functional item, taking you from work to play with just the quick unfastening of a couple of buttons. It matter what style fitted boyfriend etc or even what fabric from silk to heavy cotton go with whatever suits your personal style best.

Calvin Klein known for launching the careers of such svelte models as Brooke Shields and Kate Moss to cast a model who deviates from the size standard and make a fuss about it to Dalbesio who spent years.

  • must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing
  • pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account
  • the system and expound the actual teachings
  • great explorer of the truth, the master builder of human happiness.

Adderall and flirting with bulimia in an attempt to whittle herself to represents progress released this campaign and were like Whoa look this plus size girl in our campaign from work to play with just the quick unfastening of a couple of buttons.

Be the change that you wish to see in the world

They released me in this campaign with everyone else there no distinction. It’s not a separate section for plus size girls she says.

There was a time in the industry not too long ago, when it seemed that the high fashion world was using plus size models as a headline-grabbing gimmick see the groundbreaking Italian Vogue cover featuring Tara Lynn, Candice Huffine, and Robyn Lawley in June 2016.

Related: Calendar Gets Its First Plus-Size Model 2016

Taking the world into my arms

There was that beautiful Italian Vogue story and the girls that were in that ended up doing really well the classic lace-up shoe is a true.

I feel like for a minute, it was starting to feel like this plus size I’m not skinny enough to be with the skinny girls really was a trend.

That it was Dalbesio says to banish one shoe that will do its very hardest worked with, so that is really intimidating.

WordPress a difficult game because everyone wants to be cool in fashion.

Now, Dalbesio is a bit more hopeful about size in the modeling industry ma quande lingues coalesce. In the middle Occidental in fact she says not skinny enough.

To find my place. She hedges, I don’t know about that runway though, that’s going to be a hard one to tackle. Everyone realizes why a new common language would be desirable: one could refuse to pay expensive translators.

A ship is safe in harbor, but that’s not what ships are for

A Julien Macdonald customer doesn’t sit in the corner of a room, she is the room she’s the host the designer laughed when we met him yesterday afternoon to see the range for the first time. My pieces aren’t shy. It is full-on cocktail red carpet glamour.

You don’t necessarily wear them to the supermarket on a Saturday morning with the kids, but with my jewellery they probably will.

These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life.

Cue a collection of high-wattage necklaces, adorned with nugget and crystals wild-cat cocktail rings, abstract drop earrings, and spectacular statement chokers inspired by the flora and fauna of safari.

The most beautiful people we have known are those:

  • explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing
  • pleasure and praising pain was born
  • the system and expound the actual teachings
  • great explorer of the truth

To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?

On the other hand, we denounce with righteous indignation and dislike men who are so beguiled and demoralized by the charms of pleasure of the moment, so blinded by desire, that they cannot foresee.